How the Collective Power of Women Can Change the World (Part 3 of 3)

14 Jun 2012

by Carolyn Parrs

This is Part 3 of 3 on “How the Collective Power of Women Can Change the World”

Read Part 1

Read Part 2

At a peace summit in Vancouver, the Dalai Lama made an extraordinary statement when he said that the world will be saved by the western women. This proclamation created a tsunami of responses in cyberspace. Can you imagine? The Dalai Lama saying it will be women that will save the world? As remarkable as this was to many, it was “duh” moment for me. I thought, of course, it’ll be women. We purchase 85% of the consumer goods in the United States. We can do right now by what we buy – and don’t buy. That was my “ah-ha” moment. That’s when I decided to write and speak on this topic.

Let’s look at the numbers. It is estimated that American women spend about five trillion dollars annually. That’s over half of the US GDP. We purchase everything from autos to health care. Here are some quick stats on our purchases:

91% of new homes

66% PCs

92% vacations

80% healthcare

65% new cars

89% bank accounts

93% food

93 % OTC pharmaceuticals

And here’s what we’re doing online:

22% shop online at least once a day

92% pass along information about deals or finds to others

171 average number of contacts in their e-mail or mobile lists

According to the New York Times, “There are more women controlling more wealth in the US than ever before. Of those in the wealthiest tier of the country defined by the IRS as individuals with assets of at least $1.5 million, 45% are women.”

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see what we can do if we rally our forces and use our economic power to “chart a different course”, as Elizabeth Lesser says. We’ve got the power. We’ve got the smarts. So why aren’t we sending big messages to Madison Avenue every day with our pocketbooks? As a marketer of sustainable products and services for the last 10 years what I’ve noticed over and over again is this: Most of us simply do not know what we’re putting into our pores.

Would you buy that brand-new baby blue carpet for your child’s nursery if you knew that a baby crawling on a conventional carpet inhales the equivalent of four cigarettes a day? Would you smear that satiny chartreuse paint on your walls if you knew that indoor air pollution is two to 20 times more toxic than outdoor air pollution, even if you live in an industrialized city? We’re getting out-gassed on a daily basis and we don’t even know it.

The truth is in the United States, about 80,000 industrial chemicals are registered for use in all of the products we eat, touch‚ wear‚ and use to furnish our homes, but fewer than 20 percent have been tested for their impact on human health and the environment. These include ingredients in our food, household cleaners‚ and body care products. They include chemicals used on and in toys and furniture and clothing and bed linens.

A recent study by scientists at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, at the University of Sherbrooke Hospital Centre in Quebec, found traces of toxic pesticides in 93 percent of pregnant mothers and 80 percent of the umbilical cords. The umbilical cord! According to the study, “Toxic pesticides, which are injected into genetically modified (GM) crops, have found their way into the bloodstream of most women tested.” It’s the meat, milk, and eggs we eat from livestock that have been fed genetically modified corn that are having a toxic effect on our unborn children.

The sad but true part of this is that the GM food industry has also fed us the lie that these destructive pesticides would simply “pass through” the body without any harm. Every mother knows that what you put in your body, you put in your baby. There’s no such thing as just passing through. These GM crops have been linked to allergies, miscarriages, birth abnormalities and cancer. Yet, they are sold openly and frequently in grocery stores across America.

To make matter worse, a study by the Environmental Working Group revealed that at least 287 hazardous industrial chemicals pass through the placenta to the fetus. Synthetic chemicals are so prevalent in a woman’s breast milk today that, if bottled for sale, most breast milk would not pass FDA regulations. While studies still document that breastfeeding remains the best option for building infant immunity (I nursed both of my kids and would do it again), the quantity of chemicals we are exposing our young to is unacceptable on all counts.

“Our female biology makes us extremely vulnerable to toxic exposures. When we are pregnant, the fetus is particularly susceptive to chemicals that can cause birth defects. As nursing mothers, we feed our babies dangerous compounds – like pesticides and even rocket fuel – that have accumulated in our breast milk. As we age, we face one in 10 chances of contracting breast cancer from causes that are increasingly being linked to environmental contaminants,” says Diane MacEachern, author of Big Green Purse.

It’s not only our children that are being poisoned, but also ourselves. Women’s health problems related to environmental exposure are on the increase, such as breast cancer rates. Over the last two decades, they have risen from a lifetime risk of one in 20, to one in seven. And according to the Centers for Disease Control, African American women are more likely to die of breast cancer than are women of any other racial or ethnic group.

There are volumes and volumes of information that link women’s health to our toxic consumption. Here’s the good news. We can turn Madison Avenue into Madam Avenue and collectively decide not to buy those crappy products anymore. We hold the purse strings to what lines the shelves of our supermarkets. Not the manufacturers. They just put it there. But if we collectively decided not to buy those products anymore, what would happen then? You know the answer, and so do I. They wouldn’t make them. It’s as simple as that. It’s all about the bottom line.

“Women’s consumer spending affects virtually every aspect of the environment.“ says Diane MacEachern. “All this consumer clout puts us in a unique position to create the world we want.” Think: The women of Africa. Think: The youth of Egypt. Think: The collective power of American women. Our power of NO can force the marketplace to innovate and circulate products that are both affordable and healthy for our families. And you know what that means? WE are the key to creating a healthy, safe, wholesome world. WE are the ones we’ve been waiting for. Not Madison Avenue. You, and me, and 170 million other American women. Our collective, strategic force can and will move mountains.

Don’t go back to sleep.

We are the ones we’ve been waiting for.

 

This is Part 3 of 3 on “How the Collective Power of Women Can Change the World”

Read Part 1

Read Part 2

Carolyn Parrs is deeply passionate about harnessing the power of women to help create a positive, dramatic and measurable impact on the planet. She is the creator of Women Of Green, an online community and multi-media blog about turning up the volume of the feminine voice in green. She is also co-founder of Mind Over Markets, a strategic green marketing communications company in Santa Fe, NM. As a Marketing and Life Coach, Carolyn helps women launch and grow green or socially-focused businesses. “Business is one of the most powerful forces on the planet for change — and as more and more women launch and grow sustainable businesses, collectively we can make a big economic and social impact — fast.”

 

 

 

 

 

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14 Responses to “ How the Collective Power of Women Can Change the World (Part 3 of 3) ”

  1. Tina says:

    Awesome things here. I am very glad to look your article.
    Thanks so much and I’m taking a look forward to contact you. Will you please drop me a e-mail?

  2. Garrett says:

    I seldom leave comments, however i did some searching and wound up here Women Of Green: Turn Up the Volume ? How the Collective Power of Women Can Change the World (Part 3 of 3).
    And I actually do have 2 questions for you if you usually do not mind.
    Is it simply me or does it look like a few of the remarks appear like they are written
    by brain dead people? :-P And, if you are writing at additional social sites,
    I would like to follow everything new you have to
    post. Would you make a list of every one of all your communal sites like your twitter feed, Facebook page or linkedin profile?

  3. Carolyn says:

    Brain dead people. Hmm…. What remarks are you referring to? If you still want to follow us, you surely can at Twitter (@womenofgreen) and Facebook here: http://www.facebook.com/womenofgreen. Thanks Garrett.

  4. Carolyn says:

    Tina, thanks for your comment. You can email me at carolyn (at) mindovermarkets (dot) com. Love to hear from you.

  5. Rhys says:

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    I think that you can do with a few pics to drive the message home a little bit, but other than that, this is magnificent blog.
    A fantastic read. I will certainly be back.

  6. Carolyn says:

    Thanks for the vote of confidence. And yes, the book is being written now. Stay tuned!

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